A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone Social Responsibility Begins at Home

You are searching about A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone, today we will share with you article about A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone is useful to you.

Social Responsibility Begins at Home

Talk to anyone about corporate social responsibility and some of the first images that come to mind are a rainforest in Brazil, its associated conservation needs, and sweatshops in the Far East where young children make T-shirts for the West. . In other words, things away from home; Big multinationals, the sins of globalization that Seattle warriors are fighting by burning McDonald’s franchises. Society is a good concept that, if a little vague, a little idealistic, and a little moralistic, fits well into company mission statements. After all, imagine the alternative. Do you know any company that wants to pollute the environment, destroy social relations, or run offices like concentration camps?

The trouble with global social responsibility is that it distracts from what’s happening next door or downstairs. Companies that are ‘socially responsible’ – according to the pollution-no-child-labor stereotype – may, in fact, implement socially irresponsible policies that affect their own staff. Sumantra Ghoshal, a professor at the London Business School in the UK, described the atmosphere in some companies as ‘Calcutta in summer’, a suffocating atmosphere. Such companies may have mission statements expressing their commitment to social responsibility: promising not to pollute rivers, while ignoring the daily pollution of the minds of their workforce.

Ghoshal is right. Some work environments are not good! High levels of internal politics and personal battles, disregard for the lives of employees who are mere numbers on a spreadsheet and irrational ‘advance policies’ (hire fast/fire fast) can lead to a ‘Calcutta in summer’ office. The company vowed never to dump the chemical in a nearby river.

Social responsibility, like philanthropy, starts at home: in the manager’s office next door and downstairs in the HR department and labs. It has to do with the fact that people spend most of their everyday lives working for organizations and understand that they have a ‘social responsibility’ – whether the company wants to recognize it or not. It has a responsibility to provide an environment that respects the individual, enhances the human condition and values ​​the employee. Surely, if it’s good for trees, it’s good for humans.

There is no difference between those who think that polluting a river by a chemical plant is a necessary evil to meet business goals and those who think it is an unrealistic-wonderful thing. Years ago, such people got away with murder because the population was largely unaware of the problem, or quiet or insensitive. Today, such practices have made headlines as an unsustainable setback for the organization. Perhaps, a few years from now, Calcutta-in-summer workplaces will make similar headlines with similar developments.

As a self-confessed novice in green matters, who else needs to be reminded what a recycling box is, it may seem strange that I use the ‘green example’. I am not bringing them here as an expert practitioner, but to compare and expose the double standards of so-called social responsibility.

The circadian mind of the manager

One of the behaviors one finds in an environment less than socially responsible is managerial schizophrenia. Outside the office, a manager can be kind, civilized, and a church-goer. In the workplace, he may make himself into a carefree nine-to-five manager who, quite frankly, may not care much about the ‘work environment’ as long as ‘the numbers are achieved’ (and his bonus is secure). Perfectly reasonable human beings become very unreasonable managers when they enter the office as if affected by some sort of poisonous gas. Once in the workplace, toxicology management takes place. It is circadian like night and day.

A company’s apparent need to have policies and procedures is a perfect excuse for toxic managers. They say, “Sorry, it’s not me, I have to do it, it’s company policy“or”If it’s up to me, I allow it, but I don’t make the rules“; or”I can’t allow you to do that, because then everyone will expect the same“. And the employee was denied a small privilege that made no difference in the running of the business, but that might have made all the difference to the working mother, like a little flexibility in her work hours.

Managers who hide behind company policies – ‘I don’t make rules’ or ‘I have to treat everyone the same’ – often lie. In many cases, they have the power and ability to explain company policy. They can make an exception to the rule and make a special concession to the individual, because common sense says that the rule was not invented to make life difficult.

One of the toxic manager’s best defenses in the Calcutta environment is to use ‘internal equity’ as an all-season argument. “We must look at the equity aspects of this issue in the organization,” a manager or HR leader says, “We cannot ascribe it to Smith, nor can it stand as an example to others“.

That kind of argument presupposes a lot of things, but what always baffles me is that the entire organization is likely to want the same thing as Smith. In most cases this is not true. For example, I did an MBA sponsored by my employer. As I recall, there were no strict criteria as to who could do it. I know two colleagues like me who are sponsored. My boss who wants to do MBA is not in a big queue at the office! In fact, some of us work harder than our normal workload. In another institution, such an opportunity would not have been available because (here comes): “This is not fair in terms of internal equity!”

Fair, great parapet

Fairness is a word that can be used with great discretion. Most managers – and most HR departments – are preoccupied with maintaining fairness. And yet, under this parapet, they exhibit the greatest injustice of all, homogenization. Fairness, arbitrarily defined and interpreted, may boost a manager’s moral ego but may not impress anyone else. Pay differentials between staff, executive powers, boards driven by personal gain are all unfair, yet they are part of everyday life.

You may believe that at this point I am determined to paint a bleak picture of business life. Let me be clear: I know that business life can be extremely rewarding and enlightening. I also appreciate that a lot of work is done in non-Calcutta environments. But the so-called social responsibility should not mask the cynical way in which corporations act. The organization is socially irresponsible, despite all its ‘environmental’ policies, and if what it achieves is a good track record of clean rivers, it is a useless place as internal mental pollution simply replaces external pollution. Call it my lack of environmental education, but I can’t stand environmentalists who care about recycling their memos, who dispose of cans in separate containers, and who use the same hotel towel every day to save water while polluting the work environment. of the people who work for them. Maybe have offices or cubicles painted green for those managers.

Pending revolutions

The customer revolution took place in the 1980s with the expansion of customer services departments. Today, these are the baseline; They no longer raise eyebrows of appreciation. Companies should have them. While the quality movement focused on quality as the end, today, it is the starting point. In a few years, you won’t see the ISO logo on letterheads or on a company van.

Now, as the shareholder revolution begins, the actions of boards and management are increasingly scrutinized. The next big revolution is the employee revolution. At that point, toxic management emerges and companies with no intrinsic social responsibility make headlines. The companies that are brave enough to look themselves in the mirror and recognize socially irresponsible internal practices and do something about them will win the game.

You and I know companies full of ‘good people’. In most cases, however, we say: “Individually, we are all fundamentally good people. Collectively, we can be a bunch of arrogant people who excuse the rules set down somewhere for power and control.“. If the working environment can produce Calcutta-in-summer managers who are ‘personally good people’, this environment is toxic; you should avoid it if you can. And that’s the problem: ‘if you can’ . After all, a few million people live in Calcutta. Many Can’t be anywhere else and some may even love summer.

Social responsibility is not just a green issue or an ethical corporate governance approach to not polluting rivers and cutting down trees in Brazil. It should start at home. That is, in an office next door, a manufacturing plant or a project team. But none of this is taught in business schools.

Video about A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone

You can see more content about A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone

If you have any questions about A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 1693
Views: 77673105

Search keywords A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone

A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone
way A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone
tutorial A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone
A Whole Bumch Of.Weird.Pictures Are Saved To My Phone free
#Social #Responsibility #Begins #Home

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?Social-Responsibility-Begins-at-Home&id=949035

Related Posts

default-image-feature

A Video Telling A Person Of Getti.G Off There Phone Your 2020 Guide on How to Get the Most Out of Video Marketing

You are searching about A Video Telling A Person Of Getti.G Off There Phone, today we will share with you article about A Video Telling A Person…

default-image-feature

A U.S Based Mobile Phone Number Registered In Your Name Received a Text But Don’t Know Who it Is? Try Running a Reverse Phone Search

You are searching about A U.S Based Mobile Phone Number Registered In Your Name, today we will share with you article about A U.S Based Mobile Phone…

default-image-feature

A Tax Of 1.00 Per Residential Phone Number Is Collected Norway Between The Reality And Thoughts

You are searching about A Tax Of 1.00 Per Residential Phone Number Is Collected, today we will share with you article about A Tax Of 1.00 Per…

default-image-feature

A Portion.Of My Phone Is Darker In.My Samsumg.Galaxy How The New iPhone 4S From Apple Compares With The Samsung Galaxy S2

You are searching about A Portion.Of My Phone Is Darker In.My Samsumg.Galaxy, today we will share with you article about A Portion.Of My Phone Is Darker In.My…

default-image-feature

A Phone Call Or Face-To-Face Visit Is Better Channel Sun Tzu Art of War – Communication Tools

You are searching about A Phone Call Or Face-To-Face Visit Is Better Channel, today we will share with you article about A Phone Call Or Face-To-Face Visit…

default-image-feature

A Follow-Up Phone Call May Be A Good First Step How To Write A Job Winning Resume That Puts Yours On Top

You are searching about A Follow-Up Phone Call May Be A Good First Step, today we will share with you article about A Follow-Up Phone Call May…